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Suspended License

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Drivers can have a suspended drivers license for a certain amount of time depending on the infraction. Some of these infractions may be due to the following instances:

  • Driving under the influence
  • Accumulating a certain number of points on your driving record
  • Failing to pay a fine
  • Having accumulated several traffic violation points
  • Failing to pay child support

Some of the consequences that may result from a drivers license suspension may include facing higher fines, possible jail time, community service, extra points on your drivers record, extended suspension period, completion of safe driving courses and losing your driving privileges.

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How to Reinstate your Suspended Driver's License

The process of reinstating suspended drivers license credentials first requires you to comply with your suspension period. Depending on the state you reside in, you can reinstate your driver's license by visiting your local DMV office and paying the fee according to the offense you committed. Take into account that there may be additional fees to pay.

If your license got suspended due to DUI, you may need to complete a DUI treatment before reinstating.

How to Check For a Drivers License Suspension

The best way to check for a driver's license suspension is by ordering a copy of your driving record. The DMV keeps a detailed personal driving history for all residents with a driving license. Generally, your driving record will include the following information:

  • Where and when a driver's license was issued
  • Previous traffic violations
  • DUI reports
  • Driver's license status
  • Car accidents

Order a copy of your driving record through DMV.com to receive valuable information such as: violation convictions, accidents (if reported by the state), suspensions or limitations, special license classifications and DUI offenses on record. DMV.com recommends ordering a copy at least every three years.